Bone Black

Bone Black Swatch from Wild Ozark Paleo Paints.

I made bone black, from a cow vertebra that I charred inside a small tin inside the wood stove. Previously I’d used charred wood from hickory and oak. It has been a difficult paint to re-wet and it never reached the depth of black I wanted. It was also grainier than I liked. The charred bone worked great!

A historical color, the blackest of blacks

Bone black has been a thing since the very early history of mankind. Charcoal from wood has always been more convenient and served well enough for most needs. But like me, someone somewhere must have need a deeper black than they could get from charred wood. Here’s a link to a little more info about that from Pigments Through the Ages website.http://www.webexhibits.org/pigments/indiv/recipe/boneblack.html

I’m not sure what that last line in the 19th century recipe means, but I may need to rinse the pigment before making the paint. We’ll see what happens. I didn’t find that link until writing this post, and I had already made the paint before that. Maybe for the next batch I’ll try it.

The process for making bone black

First I broke the bone into small enough pieces to fit inside the tin. The ashes from yesterday’s fire still occupied the stove. Too much air causes the bone to burn rather than char. Burying it under ashes inside the tin helps with that. Then I built the fire over it and let it burn down.

Charred bone for bone black handmade watercolor Paleo Paint. Fresh out of the wood stove. The bones were cleaned and thoroughly dry before charring.
Fresh out of the wood stove. The bones were cleaned and thoroughly dry before charring.

The charred bones were a lot lighter and easier to break down in the mortar than they were before. The bones were really difficult to break into small enough pieces to fit inside the tin. But afterward, the crushing was a breeze.

It’s still a very messy color to make. The powder floats into the air just as much as the charred wood does, so wear a dust mask if you make this. Or have a fan blowing the dust away from you. Just don’t put the fan too close, or you’ll blow your pigment out of the screen.

Once I had it crushed as fine as I could do with the mortar and pestle, I sifted the powder through a 200-mesh screen.

I sifted all I could through the screen, and put the difficult bits back into the mortar. Then and repeated the sifting process. After that was done, I put the more difficult bits into a small jar and added enough of the watercolor media to cover it plus some. I’ll strain that later and use the fluid to either make a sheer black or add it to the next fine sifted powder on the mulling board to see if it intensifies the black any.

The paint

Bone black on the mulling board. Such a nice smooth black!
Bone black on the mulling board. Such a nice smooth black!
Making black is always messy business. This one is worth it, though.

Once it dried, it doesn’t ‘smear’ when I rub on it – which is a good thing! It is a flat black, not glossy, but it’s exactly what I need to finish up my red-shouldered hawk painting.

A little slide-show presentation about making Bone Black.

Madison Woods is an author, artist, and Paleo Paint maker living
with her husband in northwest Arkansas far off the beaten path. She uses paint made from rocks, and mostly Ozark pigments to create her paintings.

Contact Info:
Email: Madison@wildozark.com
Instagram: @wildozark
Facebook: @wildozark

Paint from Red Sandstone

Handmade Watercolor Paint from Red Sandstone

Today I made several different shades of paint from red sandstone.

When I make a paint from a pigment-rich stone, like this one, rather than waste what is left on the plate after mulling and scraping up the paint, I’ll add either calcium carbonate (white white) or one of my other pigments to create a blend.

The Process

Making Paint from Red Sandstone

Find the red sandstone

First, I gathered the rock. Here’s how this stone looks if it’s on the ground. They’re easiest to see when damp, so most often I’ll get them out of the creek.

A red sandstone in the driveway. They're easier to spot when damp or wet.
A red sandstone in the driveway. They’re easier to spot when damp or wet.

Grind the rock

I ground the rock up with a mortar and pestle. If I’m starting with a rock larger than a marble, I’ll first break the rock into smaller pieces with a larger rock. I do that part outside.

Wash the pigment

Once the rock is ground, I’ll add it to a quart sized jar and fill the jar with water. When there’s a lot of pigment present, the water will be a strong color. If the water clarifies quickly, then I don’t separate it and will just pour the water off and dry the pigment that has settled.

To separate, pour off the colored water into small jars and leave the heavier part (the ‘heavies’) in the original jar. Then let it settle. These are what I call the ‘lites’ or ‘lights’. If there is still a lot of color in the water after fifteen or thirty minutes or so, I’ll pour it off again into more small jars and let that part settle separately. I call that part ‘lite lites’. The heaviest portion that is left in the jar after pouring off the color water is what I call ‘heavies’.

Remember to label everything. Otherwise you’ll have a hard time remembering what is what when you get ready to start making the paint.

Why bother washing?

Heavies, Lites, and Lite Lites will often yield enough difference in shades to make it worth the effort. Sometimes it doesn’t. The red sandstone usually does. Aside from the difference in shade of color, there is a difference in texture. Heavies of any pigment are generally grittier and lites are always very smooth.

Dry the pigment

After the sediments have settled and the water is clear, pour off the clear part and keep the sediment. That is your pigment. Let this dry. I use a desiccator for this sometimes.

Sieve or grind

Once the pigment is dry it may need to be ground up more in the mortar, or if it’s a solid cake (the lites do this), you’ll need to break and sieve it so that there are no clumps when you begin the mulling.

Mull the paint

This is assuming you’ve already prepared your media. There’s no method to my madness in the order I made the paint, but I started with the ‘lite lites’.

Making paint from red sandstone-Add a little pile of pigment and make a dent in it. Add the media to the dent and let it soak in for a little while before stirring it good with the spatula.
Add a little pile of pigment and make a dent in it. Add the media to the dent and let it soak in for a little while before stirring it good with the spatula.
The red sandstone lite lites on the mulling plate.
The red sandstone lite lites on the mulling plate.

Once I’d scraped all I could off of the plate, there was still a lot of color left behind. This particular pigment is so pervasive it almost stains the glass. So to avoid washing it down the drain, I’ll add a teaspoon or so of calcium carbonate (pure limestone) and use it to pick up the rest of the color.

When I make paint from red sandstone, I don't like to wash the residue on the plate down the drain so I use calcium carbonate to make a lighter shade of gouache.
When I make paint from red sandstone, I don’t like to wash the residue on the plate down the drain so I use calcium carbonate to make a lighter shade or gouache. Most of my handmade watercolors are more like gouaches than transparent watercolors because of the nature of earth pigments. But the limestone powder makes it even more opaque.

Rinse and Repeat to make more shades of paint from red sandstone

I followed the same procedure for the other two fractions (heavies and lites). But instead of using only the calcium carbonate at the end after scraping the plate as clean as I could, I added some of my other pigments. To the lites I added a yellow lites. And to the heavies I added pink lites.

Red Sandstone Paint Swatches

The Finished Paints

All the color variations of my red sandstone paint.

Madison Woods is an author, artist, and Paleo Paint maker living
with her husband in northwest Arkansas far off the beaten path. She uses paint made from rocks, and mostly Ozark pigments to create her paintings.

Contact Info:
Email: Madison@wildozark.com
Instagram: @wildozark
Facebook: @wildozark

I’ll have some of the paints I’m making this week for sale at the Little Craft Show in Bentonville on December 7, 2019. Whatever doesn’t sell there will be listed at my Wild Ozark shop soon after. If you’re in the area, come out to see my original paintings, prints, and handmade watercolor paints. All of it features Ozark pigments!

What are Paleo Paints?

The Paleo Paints

My husband once said my handmade paints reminded him of how the cave men made their paints for the cave drawings. And he was right! And so we called them Paleo Paints.

I make them by crushing rocks, clay, charred wood, and extract certain leaves to create pigments which are then added to a binder to make paint.

The type of binder used determines what kind of paint it is: gum Arabic for watercolors, linseed oil for oil paints, and egg yolks for tempera. Other binders can be used to serve the same purposes, but these are the three most people are familiar with.

I crush the rocks by hand with a mortar and pestle. But before that, I collect the rocks or herbs, or clay or char.

Some typical rocks that look like good pigment rocks. I'll pick out the one between the two larger ones.
Some typical rocks that look like good pigment rocks. I’ll pick out the one between the two larger ones.

When I see a rock that looks like it’ll make good pigment, sometimes I’ll crush a part of it on a larger rock out in the field to see what I might expect from it.

A tested rock. Excellent source of pigment for Paleo Paints!
A tested rock. Excellent source of pigment for Paleo Paints!

You’ll often find me with bulging pockets because I’ve seen something wonderful that needed to be made into paint and didn’t go out prepared to carry more than a handful home.

Crushed red sandstone that I'll use as a pigment for my Paleo Paints.
Crushed red sandstone that I’ll use as a pigment for my Paleo Paints.

The colors in my palettes are earthy, and rich with the essence of place. Each color carries with it a story that tells the origins of earth’s history for that particular spot where it lived.

Some of the colors from my first set of handmade watercolor paints.
Some of the colors from my first set of handmade watercolor paints.

By working with these materials to make paint, I feel a sense of collaboration and partnership – a harmony I have no other way to translate other than by making art.

I hope it brings the sacred tunes of ancient and ever-adapting life to your soul when you work with them, too.

Paleo Paint Workshops

Do you prefer hands-on learning? I offer workshops to share the information I’ve learned so far. Most are single day workshops, but some of the more advanced ones will meet more than once because the process can’t be finished in one day.

Where to Find my Paleo Paints?

They’re at the WildOzark online shop whenever any are available.

You can also see them (and try them out!) in person on Sundays when I’m at the Kingston Square Arts. Check my schedule to see when and where I’ll be.

I’ll try to keep them stocked at Kingston Square Arts in Kingston, Arkansas, but availability is usually limited. I ordinarily only make more paint when I need more for my paintings. There’s a corner of the gallery back by the register that belongs to Wild Ozark. Lots of excellent pottery and art in there, so it’s worth a stop if you’re going through town on the way to your outings on the Buffalo!

Original Works?

Some of my originals are for sale. You can see all that I’ve finished so far at my Paleo Paints page: www.PaleoPaints.com.

If you see one you’re interested in, contact me to inquire.

Madison Woods is an author, artist, and Paleo Paint maker living
with her husband in northwest Arkansas far off the beaten path. She uses Ozark pigments to create her paintings.

Contact Info:
Email: Madison@wildozark.com
Instagram: @wildozark
Facebook: @wildozark

Prints, Stationery

I have a lot of derivative products like prints, stickers, note cards! Those are all at the KSA gallery, and when I do events I bring some with me.

E-commerce options:

Wild Ozark shop

About The Artist

I live in northwest Arkansas with my husband on 160 acres far from paved highways. This gives me a front-seat ride with nature and is a huge influence on my life and work.

When I’m not painting or writing, I’m probably smashing rocks or out soaking up some nature and gathering photographs. I use the earth around me to create the paints for my works. My focus is on the Ozark pigments, but I will on some occasions use sources purchased, donated (people send me rocks!), or collected during travels. I love to capture the essence, the very soul of a place, with its earthy colors.

In direct contrast to that, my favorite subjects are creatures of the air. Raptors fascinate me because they’re gorgeous, yet deadly. I believe I like to paint them not only because they’re challenging, but also because they’re a dynamic opposite of the earth from which my paints are made.

When I choose a subject I look for flow of movement, intended movement, or an expression in the eyes that I want to capture.

Additionally, since most of the colors I use are created from wild-crafted rocks here in the Ozarks, I look for subjects with colors I can represent with the earthy colors in my palette.

I’m self-taught and only use the paints I make for paintings. I also use Prismacolor pencils for drawings.

Timeline: Paintings, Career Benchmarks, Awards and Accomplishments

  • 2018 July – began making paint, began painting
    • July – completed Kestrel No. 1, Kestrel No. 2
    • August- completed Kestrel No. 3
    • Sept- Pelican No. 1, Crow No. 1
    • Oct- Fox No. 1
    • Dec- Twisted Tree No. 1
  • 2019 Jan- Goshawk No. 1, Goshawk No. 2 “Rhapsody”

Links

Here’s where you can see the paintings I’ve done so far: www.paleopaints.com/paintings/

Follow me on Instagram to stay current with what I’m doing: www.instagram.com/wildozark

Appreciating the Brown Colors

I think the color brown is vastly underappreciated. Think about it. It’s the earthiest of our earthy colors. The base of all the palettes of nature. Something that exists in such abundance is also called ‘ubiquitous’. By its very virtue of being ever present, it becomes almost invisible.

But to a nature artist, the color brown, in all of its various expressions, is an important color.

Sometimes I just want simply ‘brown’. I’ve written about my excited discovery of a rock that gives me a true ‘brown’. It’s over at my Wild Ozark site because I wrote that post before I started keeping the color posts over here at Paleo Paints. And actually, the discovery goes to my youngest son, because he’s the one that brought me the first rock like this and asked if I wanted it.

A black rock that gives me brown paint.
A black rock that gives me brown paint.

When you look around with a more discerning eye, you’ll start to notice the many shades of this abundant color. They range the gamut from red, to yellow, all the way to the tint in my shale gray that is not quite black.

Brown exists in so many variations and shades, it’s impossible to pick one color and call it ‘brown’. And they’re all beautiful. But today I needed a brown that was ‘just brown’, without other color undertones. So I pulled out the black sandstone and got to work.

Not the Brown I Expected

Black sandstone usually gives me a nice brown with no other color hints. Today that rock defied expectations, though, and gave me one with reddish tints.

While it was a pretty color, that’s not what I needed. So I reached into my collection of already ground up pigments and pulled out Murdock Heavies. This one is a fairly neutral, light tan in color. I wondered if it might work as a modifier to more strongly pigmented colors. Until now I hadn’t tried blending it with anything.

After I’d scraped all I could of the (what was supposed to be the ordinary untinted one) off of the plate, there was still a lot of pigment left behind. So I dumped a pile of Murdock Heavies on it. After a bit of blending and mulling, it was hard to tell the difference between the brown I’d just finished scraping off, and the brown that was on the plate now.

The one on the right is what I got with the rock I thought would give me plain old brown. It’s a lot redder than usual. The one on the left is Murdock Heavies mulled on the plate with the leftovers of the one on the right.

A paint swatch showed a difference, though. Just enough moderation to take the red out of the first one. Much better, and exactly the shade I needed to begin with.

Ordinarily I call the original one ‘Earthy Delight’. But I don’t want to name it that with the red tones. I’ll call this variation ‘Earthy Surprise’.

I’ll call the new one made with the Murdock Heavies ‘Earthy Murdock’.

Birds of Prey and Other Finished Works

Chronological Gallery
2018
2019

You can find out more about the Birds of Prey project by clicking here. The images below are arranged in random order, so use the links at the top of the page to visit the annual gallery pages to see my work in chronological order. It’s also the best way to make sure you’ve seen all of it, as I may not update this page as often as the gallery pages.

Shades of Shale

Black shale is a common rock in our creeks and streams. The rocks are brittle and easy to crumble, and make a dark gray rub. A great candidate for making some paint.

And it makes a really buttery textured paint. But my first attempts using this stone for color brought mixed results. Our black shale is oil shale. It’s not oily to the touch, but it had some strange characteristics that proved challenging.

A basket full of black shale, fresh from the creek.
A basket full of black shale, fresh from the creek.

The paint smelled like sulfur and it was hard to wet when it came time to use it. But for a long time it was my closest thing to black, before I found out how to make black from charred things.

But it made a nice shade of brownish-black-gray, and sometimes I needed it.

Recently I decided to try again with the shale now that I’ve got a few new (old) tricks up my sleeve regarding paint-making.

Once the rock was ground to a pigment, I washed it. Washing, or levigation, is an old technique and it has a few different benefits. One is that it removes at least water-soluble impurities. If whatever was making the sulfur smell would go into the water, then it would fix the odor problem, because the water would be discarded.

Making Creek Shale, the color

The color story

So once I made the paint, it was time to try it out. I always make a little swatch of new colors, to see how they look. Again, I decided to use the 12 x 16 watercolor paper for the swatches and experiments, and then put it in my giant journal.

Levigating the shale made a huge difference in quality of the paint! And the lack of odor (so far, at least) is an added bonus. It was always an interesting gray, but the washed pigments gave a paint that is much smoother, easy to wet, and is capable of creating a tremendous range of depth. I can use this one paint for making nearly black to barely gray.

I really like the new and improved features of this paint. Washing the pigment made a huge difference in quality.

Even if it still ends up stinking, this is now one of my most versatile colors I’ll probably include in every palette.

Want to See?

Creek Shale was the second entry in my new journal. I’ll bring it with me on Sundays when I work at Kingston Square Arts, and I’ll probably bring it along at any events I show in. It’s going to be pretty cool as I add more color stories to it. Come out for a ride to Kingston, Arkansas on Sundays and take a look at it one day. I’d love to meet you and talk earth pigments and paints.

Madison Woods is an author, artist, and Paleo Paint maker living
with her husband in northwest Arkansas far off the beaten path. She uses paint made from rocks, and mostly Ozark pigments to create her paintings.

Contact Info:
Email: Madison@wildozark.com
Instagram: @wildozark
Facebook: @wildozark

Pottery Shard

The journal entry for my latest pigment "Pottery Shard".

A few weeks ago during my morning walk, I found an old pottery shard. So I put it in my pocket and finished my walk. It looked like it might make a nice paint, but I debated over whether or not to crush it. The shard, or sherd, as the term is known in archaeological circles, could be an artifact.

An old pottery shard I found in the driveway.
An old pottery shard I found in the driveway.

The land occupied now by Wild Ozark was first settled in the early 1900’s. Before that, Native Americans from the plains used the Ozarks to shelter during winter, along with the buffalo. And before that, Bluff Dwellers lived in the area. I don’t think this shard is that old. But even if it were, it wouldn’t do anything for me sitting on a shelf gathering dust. So I recycled it.

Making Pottery Shard, the color

The pottery shard in process.
Broken and ground, with a sample of it rubbed. Looks like it’ll make a good color!
The pigment on the mulling board with gum Arabic solution.
The pigment on the mulling board with gum Arabic solution.
Paint in the making, on the mulling board.
Paint in the making, on the mulling board.

The color story

So once I made the paint, it was time to try it out. I always make a little swatch of new colors, to see how they look. This time, I decided to use the 12 x 16 watercolor paper I don’t like using for paintings. And then I put it in my giant journal.

What better subject for a test painting with Pottery Shard, than a pottery pot? I'm loving the giant Book of Colors (as opposed to a 'Book of Shadows', which is what the journals are marketed for).
What better subject for a test painting with Pottery Shard, than a pottery pot? I’m loving the giant Book of Colors (as opposed to a ‘Book of Shadows’, which is what the journals are marketed for).

Pottery Shard was the first entry in my new journal. I’ll bring it with me on Sundays when I work at Kingston Square Arts, and I’ll probably bring it along at any events I show in. It’s going to be pretty cool as I add more color stories to it. Come out for a ride to Kingston, Arkansas on Sundays and take a look at it one day. I’d love to meet you and talk earth pigments and paints.

Wild Waterfall Slate

The wild waterfall slate lives near our little waterfall that spills out onto the driveway.
The wild waterfall slate lives near our little waterfall that spills out onto the driveway.

Making paint from waterfall slate

Slate isn’t the easiest rock to grind up. The first time I made paint, I gathered a few rocks from here and there to see what I would get. This rock lives near the waterfall and because of the various hues of colors I saw in it, became one of my first few sets of paints. I called it “Waterfall Shale”. I think it’s really slate, though.

I don’t really know which one it is. Maybe if the state geologists come back out here to do more looking around, I’ll remember to ask! The previous pieces I used didn’t have the gorgeous red layers in it though. I’m pretty sure this is going to affect the color. The next paint I make with this one will get a variation on the name. I’ll call it “Wild Waterfall Slate”.

Now that I’ve had a little time to learn better technique, I want to try it again. Check back later to see what became of that beautiful slice of rock. Hopefully it transformed into an equally beautiful handmade watercolor paint!

Slate or Shale?

They’re both the same sort of rock, but slate has been under compression longer and is harder. Since the rocks I found are very hard to grind, and they don’t crumble easily (except for the very thin slices) I’m calling them slate.

A Paint-Making Experiment with Murdoch’s Mystery Rock

A thoughtful person by the last name of Murdoch, who happens also to know a bit of geology, enjoyed my display over at Kingston Square Arts, bought a print, and then came back and left me a box of rocks. And today I embarked on a paint-making experiment with one of those rocks.

It is so awesome to me that people bring me rocks, because that means when they see a colorful rock somewhere, they remember the work I’m doing with them and they want to help. I love it. Since I didn’t ask permission, I won’t use his full name in this post, but usually when someone gifts me a rock, I try to use part of their name in the name of the paint when I’m done.

There were two bags full of nice large rocks. The first bag contained a tricolor sandstone looking rock from just west of Huntsville, Arkansas. So still an Ozark pigment. The second bag are some other interesting rocks from Texas. My friend Michele and I gathered some rocks the last time I was in Texas visiting her, too. So I have enough now to make a Texas collection. Since my husband is from south Texas, it’s a fitting first ‘other’ place I’ll feature.

The tricolor mystery rock

The Murdoch rock and the three shades of color.
The Murdoch rock and the three shades of color.

What’s so mysterious?

When I grind up a large rock, I have enough pigment to do some experimenting with. So I mixed all the powder in water and let it settle. Immediately after mixing it up good, I poured all the colored water into other jars and saved the sand that settled quickly. That’s what is in the jars to the far right in the photo above.

The first mysterious thing was how little color was left in that sand! Usually it’s pretty much the same color as the water. That part is what I call the ‘heavies’, because it drops out first.

So I let the water settle a couple of hours and then poured off the still densely colored water into more jars. What had settled were the particles lighter in weight than the first sands and I kept that in a smaller jar and put it in the dehydrator to evaporate the water from it. This part is what I call the ‘middles’. These weren’t mysterious. They looked about like all the other middles do.

The ‘lights’, the parts that stay suspended longest, are the other mysterious thing about this rock. Usually they’ll settle overnight, or at most, in a day or two. These showed no signs at all of settling. It must be a very fine clay. If I can get them to settle, I’ll bet it makes a very smooth paint.

Making the suspended particles settle

One of my first jobs in the science field was in a water quality laboratory at a municipal water plant in Houma, Louisiana. One of the tests we did is called a ‘jar test’. The purpose is to see how much chemical is needed to cause the suspended solids in water to ‘flocculate’. When you floc the water, the suspended solids clump together and become heavier than the water.

Then the solids settle to the bottom and the clear water can be poured or siphoned off. Or as was the case in the water plant, the sludge is filtered out in giant sand filters. The sludge is then disposed of. In this case, the sludge is what I want to keep!

A Paint-Making Experiment & a little chemistry

Yesterday’s paint making experiment was with a using charred bone to make black paint. Today’s is on how to make the suspended particles of clay settle out of the water.

I decided to try alum (aluminum sulfate) to see if it would cause the clay particles to settle. The way this works (without going into balancing equations and all that kind of chemistry stuff, which I’d have to learn all over again to explain) is that the alum has loose protons, which are positive charges. The clay particles have loose electrons, which are negative charges.

When the alum dissolves into the water with the clay all floating around in it, the two opposite charges attract each other and make bigger particles than either of them alone. And so they’re heavy enough to sink.

To make it work a little faster, I added the alum to warm water before putting that into the colored wash water I got from the rock.

Paint Making Experiment
I used 1/2 tsp of grocery store alum in 1 cup of warm water, then added it to the 4 cups of clay-colored water. Within a few minutes, I could see the clear water level at the top, another layer of flux, and the bottom layer of still suspended particles.
It's working! The suspended clay is beginning to settle. Clear water is gathering at the top.
30 minutes later: It’s working! The suspended clay is beginning to settle. Clear water is gathering at the top.

The waiting part of a paint-making experiment

So now I’m still waiting. Once all the settling stops, if it’s not complete, I’ll add another cup of warm alum water and let it start again. As it settles and the band of clear water forms at the top, I siphon that off and throw it out. Eventually I should have a good layer of clay at the bottom to work with.

Then I’ll put it into small jars and dehydrate the rest of the water out. Finally, I’ll get to see if it makes a good paint. I’ll let you know how my paint-making experiment turns out with an update here!

Madison Woods is an author, artist, and Paleo Paint maker living
with her husband in northwest Arkansas far off the beaten path. She uses paint made from rocks, and mostly Ozark pigments to create her paintings.

Contact Info:
Email: Madison@wildozark.com
Instagram: @wildozark
Facebook: @wildozark

Use the buttons below if you’d like to see the kinds of things I’ve painted with my Paleo Paints. Raptors are my favorite subject to paint, so I’ve started a project to do a portrait or three of each of the species known to visit or make homes in the Ozarks.

Pink Tequila

Pink Tequila comes from a pink sandstone, but the resulting paint or pigment color isn’t pink at all. Or at least, not very much. It’s closer to orange, but there is a slight pink tinge to the orange.

This one, like so many others have the past year, surprised me. As a stone, it looks quite pink.

Found this pink sandstone on the driveway during my morning critter feeding rounds. There’s always a new rock to find on the driveway, even in the same place I walked the day before. The rocks grow overnight like mushrooms 🙂

But once I had it ground up and the pigment mounded on the mulling board, there wasn’t a grain of pink in sight.

What happened to the pink?? Once ground up it was a gorgeous hue of orange.
What happened to the pink?? Once ground up this pink stone became a gorgeous hue of orange.

The Swatch

Since I only picked up that one small rock, I didn’t get much paint from it. I got enough to make several mini cubes. This one is in the new sets that I’ll have with me at the end of the month at the South x Southeast Art Tour.

The color is a few shades more orange than the yellow of Cromwell’s Sunrise, and it’s a gorgeous color. I named it the first thing that came to mind: Pink Tequila. And no. I don’t know if there is really such a thing as pink tequila. If there isn’t, I think there ought to be.

Pink Tequila - a warm shade of orange with just a hint of pink. From a pink sandstone, whole stone.
Pink Tequila – a warm shade of orange with just a hint of pink. From a pink sandstone, whole stone.

These will go on sale first at the South x Southeast Art Tour, where I’ll be set up with the Wild Ozark booth at Terra Studios. It’s March 30-31. After that, I’ll upload any of them left to my online shop and the Etsy shop.

The bottom one is the one I’ve been using, so it’s not for sale, obviously. The trays are made from clay that I bisque fired in the wood-stove. No plastic. The colors vary from black, to gray, to almost white.

Madison Woods is an author, artist, and Paleo Paint maker living
with her husband in northwest Arkansas far off the beaten path. She uses paint made from rocks, and mostly Ozark pigments to create her paintings.

Contact Info:
Email: Madison@wildozark.com
Instagram: @wildozark
Facebook: @wildozark